Research

Cooperative Research Groups

To tighten our links with German universities, we maintain joint projects with university research groups. Such cooperation allows an intense exchange of scientific information and expertise.

<p>The Bioinformatics Group of the University of Potsdam, led by <strong>Prof. Dr. Joachim Selbig</strong>, works together with the bioinformaticians around Dr. Dirk Walther at the MPI-MP to develop computer methods to support the analysis of  complex data. In practice, we want to determine the important variables for specific biological processes (e.g. which gene products are responding to external stimuli). The researchers use a variety of statistical, machine learning and dimension reduction methods. In addition to the analysis of complex data, the group develops internet based database systems that allow for the efficient storage, download, and management of biological data. Classical bioinformatics questions – such as the analysis of the spatial structure or the sequence comparison of biological macromolecules - are also addressed.</p>

Bioinformatics

The Bioinformatics Group of the University of Potsdam, led by Prof. Dr. Joachim Selbig, works together with the bioinformaticians around Dr. Dirk Walther at the MPI-MP to develop computer methods to support the analysis of  complex data. In practice, we want to determine the important variables for specific biological processes (e.g. which gene products are responding to external stimuli). The researchers use a variety of statistical, machine learning and dimension reduction methods. In addition to the analysis of complex data, the group develops internet based database systems that allow for the efficient storage, download, and management of biological data. Classical bioinformatics questions – such as the analysis of the spatial structure or the sequence comparison of biological macromolecules - are also addressed.

[more]

Transcription Factors and Gene Regulatory Networks

Dr. Salma Balazadeh and her group investigate transcription factors (TFs) which together with their downstream target genes constitute gene regulatory networks (GRNs) that control a vast spectrum of biological processes and often include intricate feedback and feed-forward control loops that link their activity to developmental and physiological processes. Identifying GRNs and analysing theirdynamic integration into cellular activities is thus of great interest in biology.

[more]
 
loading content